via CEREA:

Atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides from the Fukushima-Daichii nuclear power plant

CEREA, joint laboratory École des Ponts ParisTech and EdF R&D

Victor Winiarek, Marc Bocquet, Yelva Roustan, Camille Birman, Pierre Tran

Map of ground deposition of caesium-137 for the Fukushima-Daichii accident.

The simulation was performed with a specific version of the numerical atmospheric chemistry and transport model Polyphemus/Polair3D. The parametrisations used for the transport and physical removal of the radionuclides are described in [1,2,3,4].

The magnitude of the deposition field is uncertain and the simulated values of deposited radionuclides could be significantly different from the actual deposition. In particular, the source term remains uncertain. Therefore, these results should be seen as preliminary and they are likely to be revised as new information become available to better constrain the source term and when radionuclides data can be used to evaluate the model simulation results.

cumulated_total_deposition_ground_fukushima

Map of ground deposition of caesium-137 for the Chernobyl accident

The simulation was performed with a specific version of the numerical atmospheric chemistry and transport model Polyphemus/Polair3D. The parametrisation used for the transport and physical removal of the radionuclides are described in [1,2,3,4].

The magnitude of the deposition field is uncertain and the simulated value of deposited radionuclides could be different from the actual from the actual deposition. However the source term is much better known than for Fukushima-Daichii. A comparison with deposition measurements will be conducted to evaluate the simulation.

cumulated_total_deposition_ground_chernobyl

Movie of the Fukushima-Daichii activity in the air (caesium-137, ground level)

The simulation was performed with a specific version of the numerical atmospheric chemistry and transport model Polyphemus/Polair3D. The parametrisations used for the transport and physical removal of the radionuclides are described in [1,2,3,4].

The magnitude of activity concentration field is uncertain and could be significantly different from the actual one. In particular, the source term remains uncertain. Therefore, these results should be seen as preliminary and they are likely to be revised as new information become available to better constrain the source term and when radionuclides data can be used to evaluate the model simulation results.

Dispersion of radionuclides in the ocean: see the coastal simulations of the Sirocco team here.

References:

  1. Towards the operational estimation of a radiological plume using data assimilation after a radiological accidental atmospheric releaseVictor Winiarek, Julius Vira, Marc Bocquet, Mikhail Sofiev and Olivier Saunier. Atmos. Env., 45, 2944-2955, 2011.
  2. Targeting of observations for accidental atmospheric release monitoringRachid Abida and Marc Bocquet. Atmos. Env., 43, 6312-6327, 2009.
  3. Inverse modelling-based reconstruction of the Chernobyl source term available for long-range transport Xavier Davoine and Marc Bocquet, Atmo. Chem. Phys., 7, 1549-1564, 2007.
  4. Validation of the Polyphemus platform on the ETEX, Chernobyl and Algeciras casesDenis Quélo, Monika Krysta, Marc Bocquet, Olivier Isnard, Yannick Minier and Bruno Sportisse, Atmos. Env., 41, 5300-5315, 2007.

h/t Fukushima-Diary.com

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By Corbett| 1 Comment | Science

1 comment

  1. Bear in mind that this is just the cesium 137. It’s not the cesium 134, it’s not the xenons, the iodines, and all the dozens of other fission isotopes sent into the air by the exabequerels.

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